These Scammers Need a Grammar Lesson

There are scammers in every industry, certainly HVAC (heating and air conditioning) has their fair share of nomad installers.  This is why you need to pick a Diamond Certified company that has been screened and tested, licensed and insured.  Plus you get that additional protection from the Diamond Certified guarantee.

Be suspicious if you get a solicitation email with lots of grammar and spelling errors.

The following message is from our friend and advocate Chris Bjorklund of Diamond Certified. I'm reposting it as a public service and I thought it made sense for you to  lead-poor-spelling-1get some tips from the Savvy Consumer herself...read on...

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chris-2Chris Bjorklund
The Savvy Consumer
Email: chrisbjorklund@diamondcertified.org
Twitter: twitter.com/ASavvyConsumer
Blog: blog.diamondcertified.org

Are you getting lots of spam emails these days? Take a look at this one. I kept the exact wording to show you some of the tactics being used to snare unsuspecting consumers.

“Dear Chris
Please be informed that you are subject to a penalty for not filling the income tax returns by the deadline in January, 2013Please pay attention that IRS [Section 6062(b)(4)] determines a monetary penalty to the amount of $7,000 for each [Form 5430] that is sent on the expiry of due date stipulated for filling the income tax return, or does not contain exhaustive data determined in [Section 6051(b)(8)]The exemption from the penalty would be granted on condition that the tax payer proves that the late filling was based on ample grounds.More information can be found here (please follow this link)Reagrds,Internal Revenue ServicesDepartment of Treasure, TX”

Now, you might be thinking, who wouldn’t be suspicious of such a poorly written email that’s loaded with grammar, punctuation and spelling errors? I hope most of us would quickly delete this email with a push of the “junk” button. The tone, wording and mistakes are deliberate—an intentional part of the sender’s strategy. These scammers target people who respond to scare tactics, have little education and/or may not have a good command of the English language. They’re zeroing in on the gullible and vulnerable. They know people who click on the link are likely to be trusting and give out financial information without asking enough questions in advance, which makes it possible to steal their identities.

If you’re tempted to respond to one of these unsolicited emails, here are a few dos and don’ts:

  1. Never connect with a financial institution that sends an unsolicited email. Instead, open another browser and go to the real website before entering your password.
  2. Never use the same password for casual sites as you do for financial institutions. Use a unique password for each financial institution.
  3. Change your passwords frequently.
  4. Keep antivirus, firewall and spyware protection up-to-date on all computers.
  5. Delete messages that ask you to verify account information, such as for a bank, a credit card or PayPal. Don’t click on the links and don’t fall for the scare tactics.
  6. Review bank and credit card statements closely to identify transactions that aren’t legitimate. Immediately report any suspicious activity to your financial institution.
  7. Eliminate what security experts call “pocket litter”—the items you carry around that give valuable information to crooks (e.g., you might have passwords or your social security number in your cell phone address book).
  8. Check out questionable mail, email or telephone offers through these three websites: Scambusters.org, Fraud.org and the Internet Crime Complaint Center.

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chris-2Chris Bjorklund
The Savvy Consumer
Email: chrisbjorklund@diamondcertified.org
Twitter: twitter.com/ASavvyConsumer
Blog: blog.diamondcertified.org

 

If you need help with temperature, contact Cold Craft, Inc.

408.374.7292 or INFO@COLDCRAFT.COM

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