Unique Floor Insulation Alternative to Stay Warm This Winter

By Guest Blogger and Flooring Expert Donnie Gupton of Precision Flooring

With winter right around the corner it’s time to get ready for some cold weather.  If you are in your home and your feet get cold, you may want to add some beauty, comfort and insulation to your flooring.  Sure, a lot of floor insulation is done under the home out of sight, but if you are going to spend home improvement dollars you might want to consider a solution that adds beauty to the inside of your home and that would be with a special floor covering.

So, is there an attractive floor covering that will also insulate my home?

Yes, and luckily you have some options.

The obvious solution to this is carpet. Carpet is always warm, cozy and creates a comfortable setting. There are a lot of options with carpet but, if for some carpet is not a possibility, maybe you have pets or allergies or just flat out don’t like carpet what can you do?

A great alternative is beautiful cork flooring.  Cork is an excellent hard surface flooring that also creates a warmer environment.

Pictured above - one of the many cork flooring options available for your home

Let’s take a look at some of the advantages of cork flooring.

  • Cork is a Natural Insulator – The multi-cellular surface of cork flooring traps air pockets making it a natural insulator. Cork floor helps keep a neutral temperature in a room. It keeps the room cool when it is hot and keeps it warm in cool weather saving you on heating and cooling costs.
  • Noise Control – That same multi-cellular surface of cork flooring will deaden sound, making it a great floor for any room you plan on entertaining in or to rest in.
  • Soft – Cork is very soft underfoot. It’s a great floor for a kitchen where you will be on your feet a lot. Also, if you have achy joints find relief in cork flooring because is a great alternative to some of the other hard surface options out there like tile that are harder on the body.
  • Durability – Cork flooring, although softer than most other flooring options out there, is very durable. Due to the compression of this product, and its ability to regrow cells, cork flooring can recover from dents, saving you money on repairs or replacement. Also, if you purchase a quality product you can expect a very durable finish as cork flooring now has aluminum oxide and ceramic oxide finishes available just like laminate and hardwood flooring.
  • Installation – A good majority of cork flooring has a locking tongue and groove system like a laminate floor. This configuration makes it easy to install compared to other cork flooring that needs to be glued down. Pay attention to the product you are selecting if you plan on doing it yourself. Some are easier to install than others.
  • Environmentally friendly – Cork is made from the bark of a cork oak tree. This bark has to be taken off of the tree every 7 years or so for the tree to properly continue growth. Pay attention to the finish and how the product is constructed to determine how green the product is overall.

Cork is a newer flooring material that you should take the time to educate yourself on this product before you make your selection. Ptobably the best way to make a decision is to visit a local showroom that carries samples.  This allows you to see and feel the flooring and what designs are out there. Precision Flooring a flooring contractor in San Jose offers that employs craftsmen for expert installations and we invested in a 4,000 square foot showroom with a ton of options to choose from so you are sure that you are making an educated decision. If you are in the San Jose Bay Area feel free to contact us at Precision Flooring at 408-294-1970 for more information, directions to our showroom or a free estimate.

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Precision Flooring

If you need help with temperature, contact Cold Craft, Inc.

408.374.7292 or INFO@COLDCRAFT.COM

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